BuiltWithNOF

Roger H Strube, MD

Hull Design and Construction

The Hull has a very similar look to various Erik Lerouge designs including the current Freydis 49 seen in the test article published in the “Multihulls World 2008 Buyer’s Guide”, pages 118 to 121.  If you compare the pictures of this vessel under sail to the sailing pictures on this web site of Millennium Dragon you will find many similarities.  Also, check out the web site: www.tourniermarine.com/

FastHull21

The Dragon gets her speed from a combination of factors.  The design features long narrow hulls with almost a 14:1 fineness ratio.  The hulls have no “bustle” aft to slow the boat.  The rocker fore to aft is very shallow.  The depth of the cord between the transoms and the aft end of the fixed keels is only about 6 inches.  The hydrodynamic shape of the fixed keels provide more than adequate lift for sailing to weather.  Just as important they offer protection to the saildrives and rudders while providing fresh water storage tanks.  They also allow the Dragon to stand on her feet when on the hard or when the tide goes out over a sand bar.  The album below provides several views of Millennium Dragon’s hull.  There are several pictures that show catamarans with slow hull designs in the background for comparison.

MilDragHaul10Bow04

MilDragHaul10Bow03

MilDragHaul10Bow06

FastHull1

FastHull2

0

1

2

3

4

FastHull3

FastHull4

FastHull5

FastHull6

FastHull7

5

6

7

8

9

FastHull8

FastHull9

FastHull10

FastHull11

FastHull12

10

11

12

13

14

FastHull13

FastHull14

FastHull15

FastHull16

MilDragHaul10PortRudder01

15

16

17

18

19

MilDragHaul10PortRudder02

20

The Dragon was built in South Carolina by Ocean Catamarans, Inc.  A small number of large molds are used in construction to minimize the number of joints and fairing between parts.  Six (6) molds are used to build these boats.  The underbelly (bridge deck floor and inside of the hulls) is built in one piece in the longest mold (see pictures below).  The outside of the port and starboard hulls are also pulled from a mold for each side.  The deck is produced from one large mold that runs from side to side (25’) and the bows to the aft cross beam.  The port and starboard aft transom deck/steps are molded from two additional much smaller molds.

Millennium Dragon was hand laid using two layers of 26 oz Quad Axial knitted fiberglass cloth inside and out (52 oz total in both the outer and inner skins).  One (1”) inch core is used and all parts are vacuum bagged to compress the fibers and reduce weight.  Following assembly of the parts, the Dragon weighed 12,500 pounds while in the shed.  Following completion of rigging, ready to be transported to the launch area, she weighed about 15,500 pounds.  Fully loaded for extended cruising Millennium Dragon weighs about 18,500 pounds.  Pictures of the molds at Ocean Catamarans and several more recent catamarans are seen in the album below.

OC Sign on Johns Island

Factory Office Entrance

Bridge Deck Hull Mold Stern

Bridge Deck Hull Mold

Bridge Deck & Hull Mold

0

1

2

3

4

Prep Stbd Hull Side

Prep Port Hull Side

Secondary Finish Hanger

5

6

7

[Ocean Catamaran] [Cruising Log] [Your Desires, Your Budget] [Specifications] [Hull Design & Construction] [HullDesignBuild] [OceanCatamarans] [Sail Controls] [Sailing the Dragon] [Interior] [Steering] [Water] [Waste] [Electrical] [Heating Cooling] [Mechanical] [Electronics] [Dragon's Lair]